Rebirthing with the Sun’s Energy
arrow icon

Rebirthing with the Sun’s Energy

Who has said we come to Earth to live? We only come to dance. We only come to dream.

—Nezahualcoyotl

Decorative sun divider

I rise facing the sacred East direction with Tata Tonatiuh (Father Sun) on my face.  

Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla. (Welcome.)

Nahuatl

TLAHUITZLAMPA QUETZALCOATL. Nimitztlahpaloliz. Nimitztlazcamatilia Chanehque Tlahuiztlampa. Tonatiuh quizaya yahuatzinco xochicuecuepoca. Hueyi ni calli Chipahuac campa ichan Quetzalcoatl. Tzotzona atecocoli. Ce.

Spanish

Yo te saludo. Yo te agradezco, cuidador, Tlahuitzlampa. El sol sale en la mañana cuando abren las flores. Esta grandiosa casa, de color blanco, donde vive Quetzalcoatl. Suenan los caracoles. Uno.

English

I greet you. I give you thanks, caretaker of the East, Tlahuitzlampa. The sun rises in the morning when the flowers open. This great house, the color white, where Quetzalcoatl lives. Sound the conch shells. One.

Decorative sun divider

COMING FROM THE North direction of winter, out of the abyss of shadow work guided by Tezcatlipoca—the smoking mirror—can be like a plantita peeking out from Madre Tierra, poquito a poquito. As we turn to face the East, Tata Tonatiuh teases us with his warmth, his light, and his energy like the turquoise waters of the ancient cenotes.

March brings the spring equinox and the time to celebrate nature’s rebirth by freeing oneself from anything that hinders progress. It is the time where days and nights are equal.

Spring equinox’s connection to the Mexhika New Year—as we welcome and receive Tata Tonatiuh—is one of renewal, honoring new beginnings, expressing hope, and planting seeds both symbolically and physically. It is a time to nurture the seeds that will nourish our bodies, as well as our spirits, hearts, minds, and futures. It is a time to leave the past behind and awaken to see the world with fresh eyes. Spring is the time of year when we focus on self-care while we care for Mother Earth. We take time to renew ourselves in our gardens, walk and hike in nature, celebrate life and the sweetness of all things blooming—including ourselves.

Enjoying Ofrenda?

Take a moment to visualize the harvest you would like to reap:

“Creator, today, let me begin to plant the seeds that will yield me a prosperous harvest. Help me to be a diligent gardener when tending the garden of my life, removing all those things that do not nourish me along the path.”

Then carefully begin to plant the seeds that will manifest your vision. Remember to tend those seeds. They need to be fed, nourished, and protected from the intrusive weeds that will stunt their growth. A wise gardener tends their garden daily and removes anything that does not nourish it. Don't be afraid to remove weeds from the garden of your life. Although it is not always easy to completely remove them, you can remove the weeds from your garden with time, patience, and diligence.

One of the best ways to counteract hibernating in winter is to wake up early so that we can connect with nature and increase Creator’s energy in our lives. Rising to greet Father Sun, no matter how we feel, recharges us with the powerful healing rays and vibrations of the universe.

I am a night owl, and it’s difficult for me to rise in the mornings because my physical body struggles. However, after offering prayer and sacred smoke, and after receiving from the sun’s energy, my body feels better spiritually, emotionally, mentally, and physically.

I learned from my elders to honor Father Sun. In Curanderismo, we learn that our lives are interconnected not only with the moon’s cycles but also with the sun’s cycles; we learn the importance of getting enough sleep so we may rise early to greet the sun. 

The sun is a symbol of the strength, light, and power of one’s own soul. Every morning since ancient times, Indigenous people and other ancient cultures have performed various rituals honoring the external sun, as it reflects the internal and eternal. Waking up before the sun and preparing to greet it is a wonderful way to connect with the light within ourselves. Connecting with our own light enables us to start to see and connect with the light within others—for others are only a reflection of our true selves. We are beings powered by solar energy.

Decorative sun divider

Take a deep breath. Hold it... hold it... hold it... Now let it go. Let's multiply that feeling of euphoric release a hundred times, a thousand times, a million times over. Raise your arms towards the sun and close your eyes. See yourself being bathed by the warmth of the rays and recharged by the magnificent energy as you become ONE with the beauty of Father Sun’s Light. Allow yourself to be washed in the immense healing energy of a thousand planets that is soaring around the cosmos as the SUN rises.

If you cannot be outside in the sun, you can set an intention to receive Light by lighting a candle and allowing the flame’s energy to fill you with warmth. Meditate a few minutes on your inner light, allowing it to expand into the grander version of you. Your inner light will illuminate your heart, allowing abundance to enter your path. We are all connected. A’ho Ometeotl.

Top photo: Cuauhtli Cihuatl honoring Tata Tonatiuh in Teotihuacan, Mexico. Image courtesy of the author.

Rebirthing with the Sun’s Energy

Who has said we come to Earth to live? We only come to dance. We only come to dream.

—Nezahualcoyotl

Decorative sun divider

I rise facing the sacred East direction with Tata Tonatiuh (Father Sun) on my face.  

Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla. (Welcome.)

Nahuatl

TLAHUITZLAMPA QUETZALCOATL. Nimitztlahpaloliz. Nimitztlazcamatilia Chanehque Tlahuiztlampa. Tonatiuh quizaya yahuatzinco xochicuecuepoca. Hueyi ni calli Chipahuac campa ichan Quetzalcoatl. Tzotzona atecocoli. Ce.

Spanish

Yo te saludo. Yo te agradezco, cuidador, Tlahuitzlampa. El sol sale en la mañana cuando abren las flores. Esta grandiosa casa, de color blanco, donde vive Quetzalcoatl. Suenan los caracoles. Uno.

English

I greet you. I give you thanks, caretaker of the East, Tlahuitzlampa. The sun rises in the morning when the flowers open. This great house, the color white, where Quetzalcoatl lives. Sound the conch shells. One.

Decorative sun divider

COMING FROM THE North direction of winter, out of the abyss of shadow work guided by Tezcatlipoca—the smoking mirror—can be like a plantita peeking out from Madre Tierra, poquito a poquito. As we turn to face the East, Tata Tonatiuh teases us with his warmth, his light, and his energy like the turquoise waters of the ancient cenotes.

March brings the spring equinox and the time to celebrate nature’s rebirth by freeing oneself from anything that hinders progress. It is the time where days and nights are equal.

Spring equinox’s connection to the Mexhika New Year—as we welcome and receive Tata Tonatiuh—is one of renewal, honoring new beginnings, expressing hope, and planting seeds both symbolically and physically. It is a time to nurture the seeds that will nourish our bodies, as well as our spirits, hearts, minds, and futures. It is a time to leave the past behind and awaken to see the world with fresh eyes. Spring is the time of year when we focus on self-care while we care for Mother Earth. We take time to renew ourselves in our gardens, walk and hike in nature, celebrate life and the sweetness of all things blooming—including ourselves.

Enjoying Ofrenda?

Take a moment to visualize the harvest you would like to reap:

“Creator, today, let me begin to plant the seeds that will yield me a prosperous harvest. Help me to be a diligent gardener when tending the garden of my life, removing all those things that do not nourish me along the path.”

Then carefully begin to plant the seeds that will manifest your vision. Remember to tend those seeds. They need to be fed, nourished, and protected from the intrusive weeds that will stunt their growth. A wise gardener tends their garden daily and removes anything that does not nourish it. Don't be afraid to remove weeds from the garden of your life. Although it is not always easy to completely remove them, you can remove the weeds from your garden with time, patience, and diligence.

One of the best ways to counteract hibernating in winter is to wake up early so that we can connect with nature and increase Creator’s energy in our lives. Rising to greet Father Sun, no matter how we feel, recharges us with the powerful healing rays and vibrations of the universe.

I am a night owl, and it’s difficult for me to rise in the mornings because my physical body struggles. However, after offering prayer and sacred smoke, and after receiving from the sun’s energy, my body feels better spiritually, emotionally, mentally, and physically.

I learned from my elders to honor Father Sun. In Curanderismo, we learn that our lives are interconnected not only with the moon’s cycles but also with the sun’s cycles; we learn the importance of getting enough sleep so we may rise early to greet the sun. 

The sun is a symbol of the strength, light, and power of one’s own soul. Every morning since ancient times, Indigenous people and other ancient cultures have performed various rituals honoring the external sun, as it reflects the internal and eternal. Waking up before the sun and preparing to greet it is a wonderful way to connect with the light within ourselves. Connecting with our own light enables us to start to see and connect with the light within others—for others are only a reflection of our true selves. We are beings powered by solar energy.

Decorative sun divider

Take a deep breath. Hold it... hold it... hold it... Now let it go. Let's multiply that feeling of euphoric release a hundred times, a thousand times, a million times over. Raise your arms towards the sun and close your eyes. See yourself being bathed by the warmth of the rays and recharged by the magnificent energy as you become ONE with the beauty of Father Sun’s Light. Allow yourself to be washed in the immense healing energy of a thousand planets that is soaring around the cosmos as the SUN rises.

If you cannot be outside in the sun, you can set an intention to receive Light by lighting a candle and allowing the flame’s energy to fill you with warmth. Meditate a few minutes on your inner light, allowing it to expand into the grander version of you. Your inner light will illuminate your heart, allowing abundance to enter your path. We are all connected. A’ho Ometeotl.

Rebirthing with the Sun’s Energy

Who has said we come to Earth to live? We only come to dance. We only come to dream.

—Nezahualcoyotl

Decorative sun divider

I rise facing the sacred East direction with Tata Tonatiuh (Father Sun) on my face.  

Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla. (Welcome.)

Nahuatl

TLAHUITZLAMPA QUETZALCOATL. Nimitztlahpaloliz. Nimitztlazcamatilia Chanehque Tlahuiztlampa. Tonatiuh quizaya yahuatzinco xochicuecuepoca. Hueyi ni calli Chipahuac campa ichan Quetzalcoatl. Tzotzona atecocoli. Ce.

Spanish

Yo te saludo. Yo te agradezco, cuidador, Tlahuitzlampa. El sol sale en la mañana cuando abren las flores. Esta grandiosa casa, de color blanco, donde vive Quetzalcoatl. Suenan los caracoles. Uno.

English

I greet you. I give you thanks, caretaker of the East, Tlahuitzlampa. The sun rises in the morning when the flowers open. This great house, the color white, where Quetzalcoatl lives. Sound the conch shells. One.

Decorative sun divider

COMING FROM THE North direction of winter, out of the abyss of shadow work guided by Tezcatlipoca—the smoking mirror—can be like a plantita peeking out from Madre Tierra, poquito a poquito. As we turn to face the East, Tata Tonatiuh teases us with his warmth, his light, and his energy like the turquoise waters of the ancient cenotes.

March brings the spring equinox and the time to celebrate nature’s rebirth by freeing oneself from anything that hinders progress. It is the time where days and nights are equal.

Spring equinox’s connection to the Mexhika New Year—as we welcome and receive Tata Tonatiuh—is one of renewal, honoring new beginnings, expressing hope, and planting seeds both symbolically and physically. It is a time to nurture the seeds that will nourish our bodies, as well as our spirits, hearts, minds, and futures. It is a time to leave the past behind and awaken to see the world with fresh eyes. Spring is the time of year when we focus on self-care while we care for Mother Earth. We take time to renew ourselves in our gardens, walk and hike in nature, celebrate life and the sweetness of all things blooming—including ourselves.

Enjoying Ofrenda?

Take a moment to visualize the harvest you would like to reap:

“Creator, today, let me begin to plant the seeds that will yield me a prosperous harvest. Help me to be a diligent gardener when tending the garden of my life, removing all those things that do not nourish me along the path.”

Then carefully begin to plant the seeds that will manifest your vision. Remember to tend those seeds. They need to be fed, nourished, and protected from the intrusive weeds that will stunt their growth. A wise gardener tends their garden daily and removes anything that does not nourish it. Don't be afraid to remove weeds from the garden of your life. Although it is not always easy to completely remove them, you can remove the weeds from your garden with time, patience, and diligence.

One of the best ways to counteract hibernating in winter is to wake up early so that we can connect with nature and increase Creator’s energy in our lives. Rising to greet Father Sun, no matter how we feel, recharges us with the powerful healing rays and vibrations of the universe.

I am a night owl, and it’s difficult for me to rise in the mornings because my physical body struggles. However, after offering prayer and sacred smoke, and after receiving from the sun’s energy, my body feels better spiritually, emotionally, mentally, and physically.

I learned from my elders to honor Father Sun. In Curanderismo, we learn that our lives are interconnected not only with the moon’s cycles but also with the sun’s cycles; we learn the importance of getting enough sleep so we may rise early to greet the sun. 

The sun is a symbol of the strength, light, and power of one’s own soul. Every morning since ancient times, Indigenous people and other ancient cultures have performed various rituals honoring the external sun, as it reflects the internal and eternal. Waking up before the sun and preparing to greet it is a wonderful way to connect with the light within ourselves. Connecting with our own light enables us to start to see and connect with the light within others—for others are only a reflection of our true selves. We are beings powered by solar energy.

Decorative sun divider

Take a deep breath. Hold it... hold it... hold it... Now let it go. Let's multiply that feeling of euphoric release a hundred times, a thousand times, a million times over. Raise your arms towards the sun and close your eyes. See yourself being bathed by the warmth of the rays and recharged by the magnificent energy as you become ONE with the beauty of Father Sun’s Light. Allow yourself to be washed in the immense healing energy of a thousand planets that is soaring around the cosmos as the SUN rises.

If you cannot be outside in the sun, you can set an intention to receive Light by lighting a candle and allowing the flame’s energy to fill you with warmth. Meditate a few minutes on your inner light, allowing it to expand into the grander version of you. Your inner light will illuminate your heart, allowing abundance to enter your path. We are all connected. A’ho Ometeotl.

Top photo: Cuauhtli Cihuatl honoring Tata Tonatiuh in Teotihuacan, Mexico. Image courtesy of the author.

Rebirthing with the Sun’s Energy

Who has said we come to Earth to live? We only come to dance. We only come to dream.

—Nezahualcoyotl

Decorative sun divider

I rise facing the sacred East direction with Tata Tonatiuh (Father Sun) on my face.  

Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla. (Welcome.)

Nahuatl

TLAHUITZLAMPA QUETZALCOATL. Nimitztlahpaloliz. Nimitztlazcamatilia Chanehque Tlahuiztlampa. Tonatiuh quizaya yahuatzinco xochicuecuepoca. Hueyi ni calli Chipahuac campa ichan Quetzalcoatl. Tzotzona atecocoli. Ce.

Spanish

Yo te saludo. Yo te agradezco, cuidador, Tlahuitzlampa. El sol sale en la mañana cuando abren las flores. Esta grandiosa casa, de color blanco, donde vive Quetzalcoatl. Suenan los caracoles. Uno.

English

I greet you. I give you thanks, caretaker of the East, Tlahuitzlampa. The sun rises in the morning when the flowers open. This great house, the color white, where Quetzalcoatl lives. Sound the conch shells. One.

Decorative sun divider

COMING FROM THE North direction of winter, out of the abyss of shadow work guided by Tezcatlipoca—the smoking mirror—can be like a plantita peeking out from Madre Tierra, poquito a poquito. As we turn to face the East, Tata Tonatiuh teases us with his warmth, his light, and his energy like the turquoise waters of the ancient cenotes.

March brings the spring equinox and the time to celebrate nature’s rebirth by freeing oneself from anything that hinders progress. It is the time where days and nights are equal.

Spring equinox’s connection to the Mexhika New Year—as we welcome and receive Tata Tonatiuh—is one of renewal, honoring new beginnings, expressing hope, and planting seeds both symbolically and physically. It is a time to nurture the seeds that will nourish our bodies, as well as our spirits, hearts, minds, and futures. It is a time to leave the past behind and awaken to see the world with fresh eyes. Spring is the time of year when we focus on self-care while we care for Mother Earth. We take time to renew ourselves in our gardens, walk and hike in nature, celebrate life and the sweetness of all things blooming—including ourselves.

Enjoying Ofrenda?

Take a moment to visualize the harvest you would like to reap:

“Creator, today, let me begin to plant the seeds that will yield me a prosperous harvest. Help me to be a diligent gardener when tending the garden of my life, removing all those things that do not nourish me along the path.”

Then carefully begin to plant the seeds that will manifest your vision. Remember to tend those seeds. They need to be fed, nourished, and protected from the intrusive weeds that will stunt their growth. A wise gardener tends their garden daily and removes anything that does not nourish it. Don't be afraid to remove weeds from the garden of your life. Although it is not always easy to completely remove them, you can remove the weeds from your garden with time, patience, and diligence.

One of the best ways to counteract hibernating in winter is to wake up early so that we can connect with nature and increase Creator’s energy in our lives. Rising to greet Father Sun, no matter how we feel, recharges us with the powerful healing rays and vibrations of the universe.

I am a night owl, and it’s difficult for me to rise in the mornings because my physical body struggles. However, after offering prayer and sacred smoke, and after receiving from the sun’s energy, my body feels better spiritually, emotionally, mentally, and physically.

I learned from my elders to honor Father Sun. In Curanderismo, we learn that our lives are interconnected not only with the moon’s cycles but also with the sun’s cycles; we learn the importance of getting enough sleep so we may rise early to greet the sun. 

The sun is a symbol of the strength, light, and power of one’s own soul. Every morning since ancient times, Indigenous people and other ancient cultures have performed various rituals honoring the external sun, as it reflects the internal and eternal. Waking up before the sun and preparing to greet it is a wonderful way to connect with the light within ourselves. Connecting with our own light enables us to start to see and connect with the light within others—for others are only a reflection of our true selves. We are beings powered by solar energy.

Decorative sun divider

Take a deep breath. Hold it... hold it... hold it... Now let it go. Let's multiply that feeling of euphoric release a hundred times, a thousand times, a million times over. Raise your arms towards the sun and close your eyes. See yourself being bathed by the warmth of the rays and recharged by the magnificent energy as you become ONE with the beauty of Father Sun’s Light. Allow yourself to be washed in the immense healing energy of a thousand planets that is soaring around the cosmos as the SUN rises.

If you cannot be outside in the sun, you can set an intention to receive Light by lighting a candle and allowing the flame’s energy to fill you with warmth. Meditate a few minutes on your inner light, allowing it to expand into the grander version of you. Your inner light will illuminate your heart, allowing abundance to enter your path. We are all connected. A’ho Ometeotl.

Top photo: Cuauhtli Cihuatl honoring Tata Tonatiuh in Teotihuacan, Mexico. Image courtesy of the author.

Top photo: Cuauhtli Cihuatl honoring Tata Tonatiuh in Teotihuacan, Mexico. Image courtesy of the author.

Rebirthing with the Sun’s Energy

Who has said we come to Earth to live? We only come to dance. We only come to dream.

—Nezahualcoyotl

Decorative sun divider

I rise facing the sacred East direction with Tata Tonatiuh (Father Sun) on my face.  

Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla. (Welcome.)

Nahuatl

TLAHUITZLAMPA QUETZALCOATL. Nimitztlahpaloliz. Nimitztlazcamatilia Chanehque Tlahuiztlampa. Tonatiuh quizaya yahuatzinco xochicuecuepoca. Hueyi ni calli Chipahuac campa ichan Quetzalcoatl. Tzotzona atecocoli. Ce.

Spanish

Yo te saludo. Yo te agradezco, cuidador, Tlahuitzlampa. El sol sale en la mañana cuando abren las flores. Esta grandiosa casa, de color blanco, donde vive Quetzalcoatl. Suenan los caracoles. Uno.

English

I greet you. I give you thanks, caretaker of the East, Tlahuitzlampa. The sun rises in the morning when the flowers open. This great house, the color white, where Quetzalcoatl lives. Sound the conch shells. One.

Decorative sun divider

COMING FROM THE North direction of winter, out of the abyss of shadow work guided by Tezcatlipoca—the smoking mirror—can be like a plantita peeking out from Madre Tierra, poquito a poquito. As we turn to face the East, Tata Tonatiuh teases us with his warmth, his light, and his energy like the turquoise waters of the ancient cenotes.

March brings the spring equinox and the time to celebrate nature’s rebirth by freeing oneself from anything that hinders progress. It is the time where days and nights are equal.

Spring equinox’s connection to the Mexhika New Year—as we welcome and receive Tata Tonatiuh—is one of renewal, honoring new beginnings, expressing hope, and planting seeds both symbolically and physically. It is a time to nurture the seeds that will nourish our bodies, as well as our spirits, hearts, minds, and futures. It is a time to leave the past behind and awaken to see the world with fresh eyes. Spring is the time of year when we focus on self-care while we care for Mother Earth. We take time to renew ourselves in our gardens, walk and hike in nature, celebrate life and the sweetness of all things blooming—including ourselves.

Enjoying Ofrenda?

Take a moment to visualize the harvest you would like to reap:

“Creator, today, let me begin to plant the seeds that will yield me a prosperous harvest. Help me to be a diligent gardener when tending the garden of my life, removing all those things that do not nourish me along the path.”

Then carefully begin to plant the seeds that will manifest your vision. Remember to tend those seeds. They need to be fed, nourished, and protected from the intrusive weeds that will stunt their growth. A wise gardener tends their garden daily and removes anything that does not nourish it. Don't be afraid to remove weeds from the garden of your life. Although it is not always easy to completely remove them, you can remove the weeds from your garden with time, patience, and diligence.

One of the best ways to counteract hibernating in winter is to wake up early so that we can connect with nature and increase Creator’s energy in our lives. Rising to greet Father Sun, no matter how we feel, recharges us with the powerful healing rays and vibrations of the universe.

I am a night owl, and it’s difficult for me to rise in the mornings because my physical body struggles. However, after offering prayer and sacred smoke, and after receiving from the sun’s energy, my body feels better spiritually, emotionally, mentally, and physically.

I learned from my elders to honor Father Sun. In Curanderismo, we learn that our lives are interconnected not only with the moon’s cycles but also with the sun’s cycles; we learn the importance of getting enough sleep so we may rise early to greet the sun. 

The sun is a symbol of the strength, light, and power of one’s own soul. Every morning since ancient times, Indigenous people and other ancient cultures have performed various rituals honoring the external sun, as it reflects the internal and eternal. Waking up before the sun and preparing to greet it is a wonderful way to connect with the light within ourselves. Connecting with our own light enables us to start to see and connect with the light within others—for others are only a reflection of our true selves. We are beings powered by solar energy.

Decorative sun divider

Take a deep breath. Hold it... hold it... hold it... Now let it go. Let's multiply that feeling of euphoric release a hundred times, a thousand times, a million times over. Raise your arms towards the sun and close your eyes. See yourself being bathed by the warmth of the rays and recharged by the magnificent energy as you become ONE with the beauty of Father Sun’s Light. Allow yourself to be washed in the immense healing energy of a thousand planets that is soaring around the cosmos as the SUN rises.

If you cannot be outside in the sun, you can set an intention to receive Light by lighting a candle and allowing the flame’s energy to fill you with warmth. Meditate a few minutes on your inner light, allowing it to expand into the grander version of you. Your inner light will illuminate your heart, allowing abundance to enter your path. We are all connected. A’ho Ometeotl.

Top photo: Cuauhtli Cihuatl honoring Tata Tonatiuh in Teotihuacan, Mexico. Image courtesy of the author.

Rebirthing with the Sun’s Energy

Who has said we come to Earth to live? We only come to dance. We only come to dream.

—Nezahualcoyotl

Decorative sun divider

I rise facing the sacred East direction with Tata Tonatiuh (Father Sun) on my face.  

Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla. (Welcome.)

Nahuatl

TLAHUITZLAMPA QUETZALCOATL. Nimitztlahpaloliz. Nimitztlazcamatilia Chanehque Tlahuiztlampa. Tonatiuh quizaya yahuatzinco xochicuecuepoca. Hueyi ni calli Chipahuac campa ichan Quetzalcoatl. Tzotzona atecocoli. Ce.

Spanish

Yo te saludo. Yo te agradezco, cuidador, Tlahuitzlampa. El sol sale en la mañana cuando abren las flores. Esta grandiosa casa, de color blanco, donde vive Quetzalcoatl. Suenan los caracoles. Uno.

English

I greet you. I give you thanks, caretaker of the East, Tlahuitzlampa. The sun rises in the morning when the flowers open. This great house, the color white, where Quetzalcoatl lives. Sound the conch shells. One.

Decorative sun divider

COMING FROM THE North direction of winter, out of the abyss of shadow work guided by Tezcatlipoca—the smoking mirror—can be like a plantita peeking out from Madre Tierra, poquito a poquito. As we turn to face the East, Tata Tonatiuh teases us with his warmth, his light, and his energy like the turquoise waters of the ancient cenotes.

March brings the spring equinox and the time to celebrate nature’s rebirth by freeing oneself from anything that hinders progress. It is the time where days and nights are equal.

Spring equinox’s connection to the Mexhika New Year—as we welcome and receive Tata Tonatiuh—is one of renewal, honoring new beginnings, expressing hope, and planting seeds both symbolically and physically. It is a time to nurture the seeds that will nourish our bodies, as well as our spirits, hearts, minds, and futures. It is a time to leave the past behind and awaken to see the world with fresh eyes. Spring is the time of year when we focus on self-care while we care for Mother Earth. We take time to renew ourselves in our gardens, walk and hike in nature, celebrate life and the sweetness of all things blooming—including ourselves.

Top photo: Cuauhtli Cihuatl honoring Tata Tonatiuh in Teotihuacan, Mexico. Image courtesy of the author.

Take a moment to visualize the harvest you would like to reap:

“Creator, today, let me begin to plant the seeds that will yield me a prosperous harvest. Help me to be a diligent gardener when tending the garden of my life, removing all those things that do not nourish me along the path.”

Then carefully begin to plant the seeds that will manifest your vision. Remember to tend those seeds. They need to be fed, nourished, and protected from the intrusive weeds that will stunt their growth. A wise gardener tends their garden daily and removes anything that does not nourish it. Don't be afraid to remove weeds from the garden of your life. Although it is not always easy to completely remove them, you can remove the weeds from your garden with time, patience, and diligence.

One of the best ways to counteract hibernating in winter is to wake up early so that we can connect with nature and increase Creator’s energy in our lives. Rising to greet Father Sun, no matter how we feel, recharges us with the powerful healing rays and vibrations of the universe.

I am a night owl, and it’s difficult for me to rise in the mornings because my physical body struggles. However, after offering prayer and sacred smoke, and after receiving from the sun’s energy, my body feels better spiritually, emotionally, mentally, and physically.

I learned from my elders to honor Father Sun. In Curanderismo, we learn that our lives are interconnected not only with the moon’s cycles but also with the sun’s cycles; we learn the importance of getting enough sleep so we may rise early to greet the sun. 

The sun is a symbol of the strength, light, and power of one’s own soul. Every morning since ancient times, Indigenous people and other ancient cultures have performed various rituals honoring the external sun, as it reflects the internal and eternal. Waking up before the sun and preparing to greet it is a wonderful way to connect with the light within ourselves. Connecting with our own light enables us to start to see and connect with the light within others—for others are only a reflection of our true selves. We are beings powered by solar energy.

Decorative sun divider

Take a deep breath. Hold it... hold it... hold it... Now let it go. Let's multiply that feeling of euphoric release a hundred times, a thousand times, a million times over. Raise your arms towards the sun and close your eyes. See yourself being bathed by the warmth of the rays and recharged by the magnificent energy as you become ONE with the beauty of Father Sun’s Light. Allow yourself to be washed in the immense healing energy of a thousand planets that is soaring around the cosmos as the SUN rises.

If you cannot be outside in the sun, you can set an intention to receive Light by lighting a candle and allowing the flame’s energy to fill you with warmth. Meditate a few minutes on your inner light, allowing it to expand into the grander version of you. Your inner light will illuminate your heart, allowing abundance to enter your path. We are all connected. A’ho Ometeotl.

Rebirthing with the Sun’s Energy

Who has said we come to Earth to live? We only come to dance. We only come to dream.

—Nezahualcoyotl

Decorative sun divider

I rise facing the sacred East direction with Tata Tonatiuh (Father Sun) on my face.  

Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla, Ximolla. (Welcome.)

Nahuatl

TLAHUITZLAMPA QUETZALCOATL. Nimitztlahpaloliz. Nimitztlazcamatilia Chanehque Tlahuiztlampa. Tonatiuh quizaya yahuatzinco xochicuecuepoca. Hueyi ni calli Chipahuac campa ichan Quetzalcoatl. Tzotzona atecocoli. Ce.

Spanish

Yo te saludo. Yo te agradezco, cuidador, Tlahuitzlampa. El sol sale en la mañana cuando abren las flores. Esta grandiosa casa, de color blanco, donde vive Quetzalcoatl. Suenan los caracoles. Uno.

English

I greet you. I give you thanks, caretaker of the East, Tlahuitzlampa. The sun rises in the morning when the flowers open. This great house, the color white, where Quetzalcoatl lives. Sound the conch shells. One.

Decorative sun divider

COMING FROM THE North direction of winter, out of the abyss of shadow work guided by Tezcatlipoca—the smoking mirror—can be like a plantita peeking out from Madre Tierra, poquito a poquito. As we turn to face the East, Tata Tonatiuh teases us with his warmth, his light, and his energy like the turquoise waters of the ancient cenotes.

March brings the spring equinox and the time to celebrate nature’s rebirth by freeing oneself from anything that hinders progress. It is the time where days and nights are equal.

Spring equinox’s connection to the Mexhika New Year—as we welcome and receive Tata Tonatiuh—is one of renewal, honoring new beginnings, expressing hope, and planting seeds both symbolically and physically. It is a time to nurture the seeds that will nourish our bodies, as well as our spirits, hearts, minds, and futures. It is a time to leave the past behind and awaken to see the world with fresh eyes. Spring is the time of year when we focus on self-care while we care for Mother Earth. We take time to renew ourselves in our gardens, walk and hike in nature, celebrate life and the sweetness of all things blooming—including ourselves.

The Practice of Intention

1

If possible, play music that inspires you to be calm. This is the time to look inward. Turn off any external distractions; silence your phone.

2

Close your eyes, taking a moment to “feel” how different and peaceful it is to have the eyes closed.

3

Take three very slow and deep breaths, trying to fill out the bottom of your lungs. Inhale and exhale slowly.

4

With either hand, take a little bit of tobacco or some dry herbs—like lavender, sage, rosemary, basil, rose petals, a combination of all of them, or imagine them, if you don’t have any. In the Curanderismo tradition, it is believed that these plants have energy that can help us communicate more deeply with the spirit realm, and focus with concentration and a sense of calm.

5

Place your hand with the herbs at the center of your chest. That is the area known as the heart chakra. Take another deep and slow breath.

6

Very slowly, start directing your attention to one or more of the emotions mentioned before: love, gratitude, happiness, and peace.

7

Then, also very slowly, start your prayer, being careful that you genuinely mean what you are saying. If you are reciting a prayer in another language, make sure you say it first in your native language and then in the other language.

8

At the end of each sentence from your prayer, add a vibration of any of the emotions. Once you feel the emotions, move them throughout your body until it is vibrating. This is a very important step because this vibration is creating electromagnetic energy that will help you manifest what you are asking for.

9

Carry on with your prayer until you are done. Remember not to rush. By the end, your body should be vibrating, and from there you are going to send gratitude to the Universe, to the spirits, to your ancestors, to everyone for hearing your prayer and making it happen.

10

If you are conducting a ceremony or ritual, empowering a place or a spiritual tool, asking for healing, or something similar, you can cup your hands and transfer all of these beautiful energies into your hands and into the mixture of herbs. Then you can offer these herbs by placing them on your altar (if you have one), placing your hands on the part of the body that you want to heal, or offering the herbs to Mother Earth.

11

Finish by staying still for a moment, just feeling this beautiful energy that you have created.

Take a moment to visualize the harvest you would like to reap:

“Creator, today, let me begin to plant the seeds that will yield me a prosperous harvest. Help me to be a diligent gardener when tending the garden of my life, removing all those things that do not nourish me along the path.”

Then carefully begin to plant the seeds that will manifest your vision. Remember to tend those seeds. They need to be fed, nourished, and protected from the intrusive weeds that will stunt their growth. A wise gardener tends their garden daily and removes anything that does not nourish it. Don't be afraid to remove weeds from the garden of your life. Although it is not always easy to completely remove them, you can remove the weeds from your garden with time, patience, and diligence.

One of the best ways to counteract hibernating in winter is to wake up early so that we can connect with nature and increase Creator’s energy in our lives. Rising to greet Father Sun, no matter how we feel, recharges us with the powerful healing rays and vibrations of the universe.

I am a night owl, and it’s difficult for me to rise in the mornings because my physical body struggles. However, after offering prayer and sacred smoke, and after receiving from the sun’s energy, my body feels better spiritually, emotionally, mentally, and physically.

I learned from my elders to honor Father Sun. In Curanderismo, we learn that our lives are interconnected not only with the moon’s cycles but also with the sun’s cycles; we learn the importance of getting enough sleep so we may rise early to greet the sun. 

The sun is a symbol of the strength, light, and power of one’s own soul. Every morning since ancient times, Indigenous people and other ancient cultures have performed various rituals honoring the external sun, as it reflects the internal and eternal. Waking up before the sun and preparing to greet it is a wonderful way to connect with the light within ourselves. Connecting with our own light enables us to start to see and connect with the light within others—for others are only a reflection of our true selves. We are beings powered by solar energy.

Decorative sun divider

Take a deep breath. Hold it... hold it... hold it... Now let it go. Let's multiply that feeling of euphoric release a hundred times, a thousand times, a million times over. Raise your arms towards the sun and close your eyes. See yourself being bathed by the warmth of the rays and recharged by the magnificent energy as you become ONE with the beauty of Father Sun’s Light. Allow yourself to be washed in the immense healing energy of a thousand planets that is soaring around the cosmos as the SUN rises.

If you cannot be outside in the sun, you can set an intention to receive Light by lighting a candle and allowing the flame’s energy to fill you with warmth. Meditate a few minutes on your inner light, allowing it to expand into the grander version of you. Your inner light will illuminate your heart, allowing abundance to enter your path. We are all connected. A’ho Ometeotl.

Continue Reading

All Issue Contents

Advertising Sponsors